Aromatherapy Uses: Bath and Douche

Aromatherapy involves using the aroma of different plants to help soothe the mind as well as the body. The aromatherapy bath happens to be a very effective method for relaxing tired, stressed bodies. Bathing in essential oils is an all-natural way to unblock congested pores and ease the symptoms of fatigue and muscle tension.

Submerging yourself in an aromatherapy bath is far less expensive than seeking medical attention for your ailments, and it’s something you can do right in your own home, without risk of any side effects.

Aromatherapy douches are also effective cleansing treatments but should be used with caution as only a few ingredients so far have been studied on the basis of their safety and effectiveness for internal use.

Preparing an aromatherapy bath is simple. Add about 10 drops of your favorite essential oils into a tub full of warm water and sink your tired body into the soothing water. Start with one fragrance and as you familiarize yourself with the different healing properties of various plants, you can start mixing essential oils to create the desired effect.

Take time to create the right aromatherapy bath environment. Your body has a better chance of relaxing if you first create the right mood. Turn off the lights and use candles instead. Close the door and tell your family the bathroom is ‘off-limits’. And most importantly, don’t rush. Make sure you have plenty of time to soak.

If you are pregnant it’s a good idea to consult with your doctor before indulging in aromatherapy baths or douches.

For aromatherapy baths, essential bath oils will penetrate deep into your skin’s pores. Scents such as vanilla will calm, lavender soothes and peppermint or ocean mist can invigorate.

Bath salts and bath powders also work well in aromatherapy baths. Just sprinkle them into a tub filled with warm water. These products help detoxify your skin, and relieve muscle aches and pains. Many will cause your bath water to change color, making your aromatherapy bath a visual experience as well.

Hydrosols (also known as floral waters) are less concentrated versions of essential oils and may be better to use if you have sensitive skin.

When douching select oils that don’t cause irritation such as chamomile, essence of tea tree, lavender or marigold oils. Always mix with water prior to use.

Here is an aromatherapy bath oil recipe.

Create a basic carrier oil blend into which you can then add your favorite essential oil. For the basic blend mix 3 ounces almond oil, 1 ounce canola oil, 1 1/2 ounces olive oil, 1/2 ounce wheat germ oil and 1 ounce sesame oil.

Pour this base oil into a jar with a tight-fitting lid. When ready for a bath, pour 1 ounce of the basic blend into warm bath water. Add 15 – 25 drops of your favorite essential oil and mix together well.

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